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Modern general dentistry has seen numerous technological advances in recent years. Most of these developments were made with the comfort of the patient in mind. As a result, visiting an advanced dental treatment center no longer needs to be worrisome. Instead, patients can take advantage of these recent advances in dental treatment to receive the best care possible.

  • Robotic and digital dentistry
  • Sedation dentistry
  • Improving dental health: How high-tech X-Rays can help
  • Lasers for tooth cavity detection
  • Evolving instrumentations in dentistry

Whether seeing a patient for a routine prophy appointment, or providing more complex restorative, periodontal or endodontic treatment, a variety of dental materials will be a part of the workflow. From capturing an impression to placing a crown to performing cosmetic whitening, highly specialized materials are needed to complete your task. Finding the right material for your practice and the case at hand is important. New dental materials are coming to the market at a rapid pace, so staying on top of your options is an ongoing part of practicing dentistry.

  • Biomaterials: Safety & Biocompatibility
  • Atomic building blocks
  • Ceramics, Metals, Polymers and Alloys
  • Physical, chemical and mechanical properties
  • Adhesion principles
  • Applications of dental materials

Patients and practitioners have a variety of options when choosing materials and procedures for restoring carious lesions or missing teeth. This technique involves placing a soft or malleable filling into the prepared tooth and building up the tooth. The material is then set hard and the tooth is restored. The advantage of direct restorations is that they usually set quickly, limited energy can be passed to the tooth from the setting process without damaging it. Where strength is required, especially as the fillings become larger, indirect restorations may be the best choice in some cases.

  • Restorations, luting and pulp therapy
  • Liners and Varnish
  • Dental Cements, Ceramics and Amalgams
  • Resin based composites and bonding agents
  • Denture resins and polymers
  • Resins in dentistry

Whether seeing a patient for a routine prophy appointment, or providing more complex restorative, periodontal or endodontic treatment, a variety of dental materials will be a part of the workflow. From capturing an impression to placing a crown to performing cosmetic whitening, highly specialized materials are needed to complete your task. Finding the right material for your practice and the case at hand is important. New dental materials are coming to the market at a rapid pace, so staying on top of your options is an ongoing part of practicing dentistry.

  • Endodontic medicaments and irrigants
  • Root canal irrigants
  • Intracanal medicaments
  • Root canal obturating materials and Root canal sealers
  • Maxillofacial prosthetic materials
  • 3D printed maxillofacial prostheses

An impression is made by placing a viscous, thixotropic impression material into the mouth via a custom or stock dental impression tray. The material, then sets to become an elastic solid, and, when removed from the mouth, provides a detailed and stable negative of teeth. Common materials used for dental impressions are sodium alginate, polyether and silicones - both condensation-cured silicones and addition-cured silicones, such as polyvinyl siloxane. Historically plaster of Paris, zinc oxide eugenol and agar have been used.

  • Desirable properties of impression materials
  • Classification of impression materials
  • Rigid impression materials
  • Elastic impression materials
  • Elastomeric impression materials

Comprehension of recent advances in biomaterial of dentistry would lead to appropriate applications of these biomaterials in clinical cases and successful strategies to improve dental treatment outcomes to better serve patients. It is important to choose most appropriate material for the regeneration of the tooth structure via biomimetic processes. The objectives of all these biomaterials and technologies are not only to replace missing or damaged tooth tissues, but also now to promote tissue regeneration and also prevent healthy tooth tissue.

  • Traditional synthetic biomaterials
  • Performance outcomes for biomaterials
  • Testing and standardization
  • Current research in dental biomaterials
  • Biomaterials for Dental Applications

Oral Medicine is the specialty of dentistry concerned with the oral health care of patients with chronic, recurrent and medically related disorders of the oral and maxillofacial region, and with their diagnosis and non-surgical management. Dental pharmacology is the study of drugs, or pharmaceuticals, typically used in the dental field. The most common types of drugs used by a dentist or dental professional are analgesics, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and anesthetics. Each drug works in a different way to address whatever the dental issue may be. In any case, the dental hygienist needs to be aware of the drugs that the patients are taking to prepare for possible medical emergencies, identify oral conditions that may be present because of the drugs which may be associated with antibiotics or a number of different drugs, determining the appropriate home care procedures.

  • Drug interactions and therapeutic uses
  • Dental Sleep Medicine
  • Oral Hygiene
  • Special drug delivery systems
  • Types of agents used in prevention and treatment

Dental Marketing is the integration of marketing strategies in the field of dentistry to help Dental Professionals harness the full potential of their practice. It involves the use of tools and techniques of marketing to achieve a certain degree of publicity and broaden the reach of the practice and the practitioner. Dental Marketing strategy is a long-term, forward-looking approach to planning with the fundamental goal achieving a sustainable competitive advantage. Strategic planning involves an analysis of the company's strategic initial situation prior to the formulation, evaluation and selection of market-oriented competitive position that contributes to the company's goals and marketing objectives.

  • Dental Marketing Trends
  • Dental Marketing Strategies
  • SEO in Dentistry
  • Dental Practice Management
  • Dental Patient Marketing

Digital dentistry may be defined in a broad scope as any dental technology or device that incorporates digital or computer-controlled components in contrast to that of mechanical or electrical alone. This broad definition can range from the most commonly thought area of digital dentistry - CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing) - to those that may not even be recognized, such as computer-controlled delivery of nitrous oxide.

  • CAD/CAM and intraoral imaging
  • 3D printing
  • Computer-aided implant dentistry
  • Digital radiography
  • Lasers

Dental Public Health can be defined as a science and practice of preventing oral diseases, promoting oral health, and improving quality of life through organized effects of the society. Dental Public Health is concerned with promoting the health of the population and therefore focuses action at a community level. This contrasts with clinical practice which operates at an individual level.

  • Oral health education and promotion
  • Oral Hygeine Assesment
  • Diet and Nutrition
  • Dental Hygeine: Care plan, evaluation and documentation
  • Caries: Future diagnostic tools and prevention
  • Dental Hygeine Standards

Oral pathology is a specialty within pathology studying the causes and effects of oral disease. Oral Pathology is a unit within the Centre of Clinical and Diagnostic Oral Sciences and has responsibilities for undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and provision of a specialist, diagnostic head and neck reporting service. The practice of oral pathology includes research and diagnosis of diseases using clinical, radiographic, microscopic, biochemical, or other examinations.

  • Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
  • Malocclusion
  • Diagnosis and treatment of oral mucosal diseases
  • Oral aspects of metabolic diseases

Forensic Odontology is the application of dental science to legal investigations, primarily involving the identification of the offender by comparing dental records to a bite mark left on the victim or at the scene, or identification of human remains based on dental records. In identifying human remains based in their teeth, dental records should ideally be obtained and compared to those of the unidentified body. Forensic odontologists and dentists are greatly involved in the identification of victims of mass disasters. Dental records are beneficial in identifying such victims.

  • Bite mark analysis
  • Technological aides in forensic odontology
  • Dental Age, Sex Estimation and Human Identification
  • Disaster victim identification
  • Forensic imaging techniques

Endodontics is the branch of dentistry used to treat, analyze, and keep the dental mash which is the delicate internal tissue of the teeth. Endodontics treatment can likewise be called as root trench treatment. Root waterway treatment is utilized to spare the harmed mash by careful cleaning and molding of the root trench framework and after that finished with filling to forestall recontamination of the tooth. Periodontics manages gums and surroundings of teeth that help the teeth in embed setting.

  • Pulp and Periradicular Tissue
  • Cleaning and shaping of root canal system
  • Management of traumatic injuries
  • Biofilm in endodontics
  • Obturation of root canal system
  • Black triangles treatment

Prosthodontics is likewise called dental prosthesis and manages dental prosthetics or manufactured substitutions. It can be halfway or finish substitutions, dental or maxillofacial substitutions and so on. Supplanting with spans, facade, inserts. Orthodontics additionally characterized as dentofacial orthopedics and orthodontia. Orthodontics is utilized to redress the ill-advised situating of teeth and state of the jaw. Treatment of Orthodontics means to enhance the practical proficiency, auxiliary adjust, tasteful congruity. Orthodontics treatment incorporates the settled and removable apparatuses, which are utilized to help move teeth, fortification of muscles and influence the development of the jaws.

  • Orthodontic Treatment & Diagnosis
  • Development of Orthodontic Surgery
  • Maxillofacial prosthodontics
  • Fixed prosthodontics

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery encompasses the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, traumatic injuries, and developmental or genetic deformities of the face, mouth, dentition, jaws and neck. Functional, pathologic and cosmetic problems are managed by these physicians.

  • Surgical procedures
  • Cosmetic facial surgery
  • Craniofacial surgery
  • Laser Application in OMS
  • Pathology and Implantology
  • Microvascular Reconstruction

Oral disease is otherwise called mouth tumor. The oral growth may happen at any place in the mouth, on the surface of the tongue, on the lips, inside the cheek, in the gums, in the sense of taste of the mouth, in the salivary organs. It is a kind of head and neck tumor. Manifestations of oral disease incorporates; fixes on the coating of the mouth or tongue, mouth ulcers or wounds that don't recuperate, free teeth with obvious reason, jaw torment, excruciating tongue, change in voice, ear torment, sore throat and so forth and medicines for Oral growth are surgery, radiation treatment, chemotherapy.

  • Oral epidemiology and risk factors
  • Pathology and molecular biology of oral cancer
  • Chemotheraphy of oral cancer and its side effects
  • Prosthetic reconstruction for oral cancer patients using dental implants
  • Complications of oral cancer treatment, prevention and management
  • Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

Dental implants are metal posts or frames that are surgically positioned into the jawbone beneath your gums. Once in place, they allow your dentist to mount replacement teeth onto them. Because implants fuse to your jawbone, they provide stable support for artificial teeth. Dentures and bridges mounted to implants won't slip or shift in your mouth — an especially important benefit when eating and speaking. This secure fit helps the dentures and bridges — as well as individual crowns placed over implants — feel more natural than conventional bridges or dentures.

  • Biomaterials for dental implants
  • Prosthetic aspects of implant dentistry
  • Implant treatment planning
  • Sinus augmentation technique
  • Grafting technique

Pediatric dentistry is a specialty that adapts techniques and procedures from general dentistry and specialties to provide primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral health care for children. Pediatric dentists treat a broad range of diseases in infants, children and adolescents, including those with special health care needs, and are experts in providing care to make their patients feel comfortable. Pediatric dentists also educate their patients and the patient’s parents about the importance of oral health and preventative oral health care.

  • Management of traumatic injuries to children
  • Advanced research in Pediatric dentistry
  • Diagnosis/imaging & Use of lasers in children
  • Preventive & Operative dentistry in children

A dental prosthesis is an intraoral (inside the mouth) prosthesis used to restore (reconstruct) intraoral defects such as missing teeth, missing parts of teeth, and missing soft or hard structures of the jaw and palate. Prosthodontics is the dental specialty that focuses on dental prostheses. Such prostheses are used to rehabilitate mastication (chewing), improve aesthetics, and aid speech. A dental prosthesis may be held in place by connecting to teeth or dental implants, by suction, or by being held passively by surrounding muscles.

  • Dentures
  • Partial Denture
  • Palatal Obturator
  • Orthodontic Appliances
  • Crowns and Bridges

The generation of new knowledge through research is an integral and highly-valued activity in the arena of Dentistry. We can improve oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research training, and the dissemination of health information.

  • Clinical and Experimental Dental Research
  • Associations for Dental research
  • Dental research Institutes
  • Ethics in Oral Health Research
  • Postmarketing surveillance