Sessions

Oct 21-22, 2021    Madrid, Spain

International Conference on

Dentistry and Craniofacial Research

Sessions

Public Health Dentistry

The essence of public health dentistry lies in the fact that the area focuses on a community or population as a whole and not individual patients. Public health dentists work towards the betterment of the overall oral and dental health of their communities. They educate patients to adapt to practices that might help improve their general dental health in the long run. Public health dentistry also concentrates on patient education, increased awareness of government programs, and efforts towards community dental health and wellness.

Dental Implantology

A dental implant (also known as an endosseous implant or fixture) is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to the bone. The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge, or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic/crown.

Prosthodontics and Orthodontics

Often called “Dental Prosthetics” or “Prosthetic Dentistry” this specialty of dentistry is associated with a dental prosthesis. According to the definition of the American Dental Association Prosthodontics may be defined as the dental specialty pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation, and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance, and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes."

Derived from the Greek words ‘Orthos” meaning straight and “odont” meaning tooth, Orthodontics is a recognized dental specialty that primarily aims to help patients obtain optimal occlusion. The area of orthodontic treatment includes correcting crooked or misaligned teeth to provide the patients aesthetically pleasing smiles. The procedures generally use the help of metal wires inserted into orthodontic brackets and functional appliances often used to correct jaw growth.

Periodontics

 

Periodontics is the specialty branch of dentistry that studies the structures supporting the teeth Periodontium that includes the gingiva, alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Periodontists treat diseases that affect the above structures through a wide variety of procedures including surgery and the use of implants. This specialty of dentistry also covers the placement and maintenance of dental implants.
Peri-Implantitis.
Chronic Periodontitis
Scaling & Root planning

Forensic Dentistry

Forensic dentistry or forensic odontology is the application of dental knowledge to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. Forensic dentists are involved in assisting investigative agencies to identify recovered human remains in addition to the identification of whole or fragmented bodies; forensic dentists may also be asked to assist in determining the age, race, occupation, previous dental history, and socioeconomic status of unidentified human beings. Forensic dentistry is the proper handling, examination, and evaluation of dental evidence, which will be then presented in the interest of justice. The evidence that may be derived from teeth is the age (in children) and identification of the person to whom the teeth belong. This is done using dental records including radiographs, ante-mortem (prior to death) and post-mortem (after death) photographs and DNA. "Forensic odontology" is derived from Latin, meaning a forum or where legal matters are discussed.

Geriatric Dentistry, Aging and Palliative Care

Geriatric dentistry deals with the older adults' dental care which involves diagnosing, preventing, managing, and treating problems associated with age-related diseases. Different problems include gastrointestinal, renal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and immune systems often decrease in efficiency, and these impacts upon the entire body, including oral health. The common oral changes in the aged people are tooth loss, dental caries, periodontitis, dry mouth, and oral cancer.  Palliative care comes into play when the patient’s disease is not responding to the treatment. Maintaining proper oral hygiene will be a difficult task for sick and critical condition patients, hence the main goal of dentist in the palliative team should focus on oral comfort which comprises the maintenance of oral hygiene, wipe out painful conditions like mucositis, infectious diseases, and ulcerative conditions of the oral cavity.

Craniofacial Surgery

Craniofacial surgery is a surgical subspecialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery and plastic and reconstructive surgery that deals with congenital and acquired deformities of the head, skull, face, neck, jaws and related structures. Despite the fact that craniofacial treatment frequently includes control of bone, craniofacial surgery is not tissue-particular; craniofacial specialists manage bone, skin, nerve, muscle, teeth, and other related life systems. Deformities normally treated by craniofacial specialists incorporate craniosynostosis (segregated and syndromic), uncommon craniofacial clefts, intense and interminable sequellae of facial cracks, congenital fissure and sense of taste, micrognathia, Treacher Collins Syndrome, Apert's Syndrome, Crouzon's Syndrome, Craniofacial microsomia, microtia and other innate ear irregularities, and numerous others

Laser Therapy in Dentistry

Lasers have been used in dentistry since 1994 to treat a number of dental problems. Yet, despite FDA approval, no laser system has received the American Dental Association's (ADA) Seal of Acceptance as an alternative to more traditional treatment. That seal assures dentists that the product or device meets ADA standards of safety and efficacy, among other things. The ADA, however, states that it is cautiously optimistic about the role of laser technology in the field of dentistry.

Trends in Dental Research

New trends are emerging in the dental industry every year. Research shows that the upcoming year is full filled with the digital dental trends that include the new technologies, improved business practices that which find new ways to optimize the patient’s experience, and as well as robot dentists also.

There are eight dental research trends specified below:

  • Dental 3-D Printers
  • Natural Dental Products
  • Digital Impressions
  • Laser Dentistry
  • Dental group Practises
  • Improving the patient’s experience
  • Automated Patient tracking and management software
  • Robot Dentists and artificial intelligence &Robotics

Current Ideas in Dental Research

The generation of new knowledge through research is an integral and highly-valued activity in the arena of Dentistry. We can improve oral, dental, and craniofacial health through research, research training, and the dissemination of health information.

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Speakers Interview